Man reist ja nicht um anzukommen, sondern um zu reisen.
Man reist ja nicht um anzukommen, sondern um zu reisen.

Aktuelle Informationen aus Afrika...

 

Für Leute, die mehr vom Kontinent wissen möchten als der Normal-Tourist.

 

SSL - mehrfach täglich aktualisiert.

Ahmad Ahmad to seek re-election as CAF boss (Wed, 28 Oct 2020)
Ahmad Ahmad said Wednesday that he will seek a second mandate as Confederation of African Football (CAF) president. The election is slated for next March in Rabat, Morocco. The Malagasy politician's reign at the continent's football governing body has been dogged by controversy. The organisation has been accused of misappropriating upto $20m in an audit sanctioned by FIFA according to a report that leaked in February. Ahmad himself is the subject of an investigation probing his role in the award of a tender for the supply of sportswear equipment for the 2017 Africa Cup of Nations. Ahmad has denied any wrongdoing. He scored a stunning victory three years ago over incumbent Issa Hayatou, a Cameroonian who had ruled African football for 29 years. Ahmad's candidacy has been backed by over forty national football federations. He only needs a simple majority or about 28 votes to win.
>> Mehr lesen

Mali sentences two to death for 2015 terror attacks in Bamako (Wed, 28 Oct 2020)
A Malian court on Wednesday sentenced to death two men found guilty of killing more than two dozen people in attacks targeting foreigners in 2015. Fawaz Ould Ahmed and his co-defendant Sadou Chaka were convicted after two days of hearings. “The court finds you guilty of the facts you are accused of and does not grant you any mitigating circumstances,” said the head of the Bamako Criminal Court, Souley Maiga. Ould Ahmed confessed to attacking a club in the capital Bamako in 2015, killing five people, in revenge for cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad published by France’s Charlie Hebdo magazine. “We are the ones who carried it out: Al-Mourabitoune,” said Ould Ahmed, who is also known as “Ibrahim 10”, referring to a prominent armed group in the Sahel. Ould Ahmed and two other men, Malian nationals Sadou Chaka and Abdoulbaki Abdramane Maiga, were charged both for the La Terrasse club attack and for another assault in November 2015, when gunmen took guests and staff hostage at the luxurious Radisson Blu hotel.  The siege left 20 people dead, including 14 foreigners. Ould Ahmed told the presiding judge that he felt no remorse for the deadly violence. The trial was a rare event in Mali, where years of conflict and political instability has weakend criminal justice systems and institutions.  Ould Ahmed was arrested by police in 2016 in Bamako while planning other attacks. Mali is currently caught in the middle of a militant insurgency in its central and northern regions which has killed and displaced thousands. 
>> Mehr lesen

Tanzania counts votes after poll challenging dominance of ruling party (Wed, 28 Oct 2020)
Tanzania is counting votes after polls in its high-stakes election closed on Wednesday evening. President Joseph Magufuli, eyeing a second five-year term, voted in the country's new capital of Dodoma. A total of 29 million voters were registered to vote in 80,115 polling stations, where they had to choose between 15 presidential candidates and 399 seats in Parliament, in addition to the councilors. "I call on Tanzanians to come out in large numbers today and vote for the decision that everyone has in their hearts. I must also emphasize the need to preserve peace as a nation, because life will go on after the elections. May God bless all the voters and may God bless Tanzania", said Magufuli shortly after casting his ballot. But even as he made the appeal for peace, the oppsotion was accusing the country's security agencies of blocking its agents at polling stations. In Dar es salaam, a female parliamentary candidate for the opposition Chadema party was arrested by police before being released later on Wednesday. Magufuli's main challenger Tundu Lissu claimed that he had received reports of widespread ballot stuffing. In semi-autonomous Zanzibar, the opposition said its members had found ballots pre-marked for President Magufuli. “We have seen a lot of problems in this election. One of them is that we have discovered in different polling stations. We have seen these ballot papers, and we have caught some people with these papers. One person is given maybe ten or fifteen, or up to twenty and there are some people who came today in the morning to report to us that they had been given ten votes to vote at the time”, said Muhene Said Rashid, deputy secretary of the elections for the opposition party ACT Wazalendo. First results expected immediately Tanzania's National Election Commission (NEC) chairman Judge Semistocles Kaijage dismissed the reports of pre-ticked ballot as false, according to The Citizen, a local newspaper. The director of the National Electoral Commission (CNE), Wilson Mahela, explained that they will begin to count the results of the presidential election tonight, as they continue to meet at all the polling stations in the country. "We expect that they will announce (the results) of the other votes for the members of Parliament and the councilmen any time today, after the closing" of the voting centers, Mahela said. Long considered a haven of stability in East Africa, say Tanzania has seen the stifling and a crackdown on freedom of speech under the 60-year-old Magufuli and his Chama Cha Mapinduzi (CCM) party, which has been in power since 1961.
>> Mehr lesen

Africanews world weather today 29/10/2020 (Wed, 28 Oct 2020)
>> Mehr lesen

Africanews world weather today 29/10/2020 (Wed, 28 Oct 2020)
>> Mehr lesen

Africanews weather Africa today 29/10/2020 (Wed, 28 Oct 2020)
>> Mehr lesen

Africanews weather Africa today 29/10/2020 (Wed, 28 Oct 2020)
>> Mehr lesen

Early voting hits record levels ahead of US election (Wed, 28 Oct 2020)
Millions have already voted but the campaigning is intensifying with just under one week to go before the 2020 US presidential election. As President Donald Trump continues his whistle stop tour of states – Michigan Wisconsin and Nebraska all in one day . That’s a normally Republican state but a change in demographics – more younger voters - could swing it for the Democrat. Polls give Biden a 10 point lead but that’s not worrying Trump. So far at least 69 million Americans have already voted. Most are wary of the health dangers of crowded polling booths, others are energized by a race framed as critical to the future of the country. The number of early ballots far surpasses the total of 58 million pre-election votes in 2016.
>> Mehr lesen

Sudanese in Israel fear being returned after normalisation (Wed, 28 Oct 2020)
Sudanese asylum seekers living in Israel fear being kicked out once ties are normalised between the two countries, though some hope their presence will be seen as an advantage. Technically at war with Israel for decades, Sudan on Friday became the third Arab country this year to announce it is normalising ties with the Jewish state, following the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain in August. But since the announcement, members of the Sudanese community in Israel have been "very afraid" of being sent back, said 26-year-old Barik Saleh, a Sudanese asylum seeker who lives in a suburb of Tel Aviv. Israel counts a Sudanese population of around 6,000, mostly asylum seekers. Thousands of others left or were forced to return after Sudan split in 2011 when South Sudan won its independence -- only for the fledgling country to plunge into civil war. Some of the Sudanese -- often labelled as "infiltrators" for crossing illegally into Israeli territory before being granted permission to stay -- were minors when they arrived. They are not always allowed to work, and they cannot gain Israeli citizenship. Saleh, who grew up in West Darfur, was just nine when his family fled war to neighbouring Chad. "My parents are in a refugee camp," said the young man, who arrived after journeying through Libya and Egypt, and has lived in Israel for 13 years. "I will be the first one for normalisation," he said. "But if I will be deported from here, then I will be in 100 percent danger," he added. - 'Not safe to go back' - Former president Omar al-Bashir oversaw Sudan's civil war in the Darfur region from 2003. Some 300,000 people died in the conflict and 2.5 million were forced from their homes. Bashir, in detention in Khartoum, is wanted by the International Criminal Court over charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity in Darfur. "We are here because it is not safe to go back to Sudan yet," said 31-year-old Monim Haroon, who comes from a stronghold region of Darfuri rebel leader Abdelwahid Nour's Sudan Liberation Movement (SLM) faction. "The reason why we are here in Israel is not because of the lack of a diplomatic relationship between Sudan and Israel, but because of the genocide and ethnic cleansing that we went through," Haroon said. Sudan's transitional government, in place after the fall of Bashir in 2019, signed a landmark peace deal with an alliance of rebel groups earlier this month. But Nour's rebel faction was not one of them. Some of those in power in Sudan today were also in control under Bashir. They include Mohamed Hamdan Daglo, vice president of Sudan's ruling transitional sovereign council. He heads the feared Rapid Support Forces, long accused by human rights groups of committing widespread abuses in Sudan's Darfur provinces. "For me it is very dangerous," said Haroon, who was previously head of Nour's office in Israel. "Unless Abdelwahid signs a peace agreement, I cannot go back." - 'Second home' - In Neve Shaanan, a suburb of Tel Aviv known for its asylum seeker community, stalls and restaurants offer Sudanese food, including a version of the popular bean dish "foul", served with grated cheese. Usumain Baraka, a smartly dressed 26-year-old who works nearby, has finished a master's degree in public policy at a university in Herzliya, north of Tel Aviv. Like Saleh, he too was nine when he fled Darfur for Chad, where his mother still lives in a refugee camp. "They (militiamen) killed my dad and my big brother, and they took everything we had in the village," Baraka said. "At one point I had two options: to go back to Darfur to fight for a rebel group, or leave the camp and try to have a normal life." While the young men who AFP spoke to expressed fear that their presence in Israel would be at risk under the normalisation agreement, some said they would like the Jewish state to see it as an asset rather than a burden. Haroon said Sudanese in Israel could be a "bridge" between the countries, not only in the private sector, but to also to help build understanding between the two peoples. "I hope the Israeli government will see this potential asset, the important role that we can bring promoting the interest of the two countries," he said. Both Sudan and Israel have said in recent days that migration would be one of the issues on the agenda during upcoming meetings on bilateral cooperation. "Israel is my second home," said asylum seeker Saleh. "There is no language that I speak better than Hebrew, even my own local language." But Jean-Marc Liling, an Israeli lawyer specialised in asylum issues, warned that with the normalisation announcement, the return of Sudanese asylum seekers would likely be on the government's radar. "The first thing that comes to the government's mind is: we'll be able to send back the 'infiltrators'," Liling said.
>> Mehr lesen

Somalis protest France cartoon and Macron comments (Wed, 28 Oct 2020)
Hundreds of protesters marched in Somalia's capital Mogadishu on Wednesday to protest remarks made by French President Emmanuel Macron defending cartoons in a French satirical magazine which are seen by some as insulting to the Prophet Muhammad. Protesters dragged the French flag through the streets before setting it on fire, urging Muslims around the world to unite in a boycott of French products. Demonstrations have been taking place in several countries after Macron refused to condemn the caricatures on several occasions. The issue has once again come to light following the killing of a Paris schoolteacher who was beheaded by a radical Islamist last week after showing the cartoons to his class. Muslim politicians, religious scholars and everyday people have condemned such depictions as a form of hate speech and view them as sacrilegious and insulting to Islam. One protester in Mogadishu accused the French president of trying to "defame our prophet", and warned the Macron and the French people "will not be able to win in your battle, you will fail". Another argued that Macron "must be punished". 
>> Mehr lesen